Blog posts tagged in Aircraft

SofemaOnline (SOL) www.sofemaonline.com Considers Aspects of Aircraft Ground Icing & the potential for Performance Degradation.

Introduction - There is no such thing as an insignificant amount of ice.

As we understand any roughness on an aerodynamic surface (caused by ice, snow, or frost) is likely to disrupt the airflow over the lift and control surfaces of an aircraft.

Frost, ice, or snow formations on an aircraft may decrease the lift and alter the stall and handling characteristics. Aircraft may become airborne in ground effect but be unable to climb.

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Sofema Online (SOL) www.sofemaonline.com is the Worlds No 1 Provider of Online Aviation Regulatory Training

SofemaOnline Training Courses are Engaging & Interactive and have been developed by Industry Professionals with more than 40 years of Commercial Aviation experience across a range of disciplines

» The Courses are configured for Tablet / Mobile Device & all delegates receive Sofema Online / AETS-Sofema (A Part 147 Organisation) Certificate on completion of the Course Examination

» Sofema Online currently offers over 220 Regulatory Compliant & Vocational Training Courses

» See our available courses here https://sofemaonline.com/lms/courses (search for the keyword - records)

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Sofema Aviation Services (SAS) www.sassofia.com considers the need for the industry to manage structural integrity in compliance with AMC4 CAMO.A.305(g) Personnel requirements (ED Decision 2020/002/R) - Related to AMC 20-20 ‘Continuing Structural Integrity Programme’

Sofema Aviation Services offers the following training in support of the understanding regarding the regulatory obligations –

https://sassofia.com/course/amc-20-20-continuing-structural-integrity-programme-1-day/

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Important Note

In every case follow the specific task guidance from the manufactures technical documentation.

Introduction

To allow the build-up of a film of dirt can actually reduce the flying efficiency of the aircraft as well as to adds extra weight. It is also possible for dirt to obscure or hide cracks, moreover dust and grit ingress can cause excessive wear of hinge fittings.

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Posted by on in Regulatory

Sofema Online (SOL) Considers the roles & responsibilities of an EASA Compliant Continuous Airworthiness Manager (CAM)

The Continuing Airworthiness Manager is either an employee of the operator (nothing to do with an EASA 145 approved organization) or heads up a standalone Continuous Airworthiness Management Organisation (CAMO), the CAMO has a specific responsibility to ensure the Continuing Airworthiness of the applicable aircraft are maintained.

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Sofema Aviation Services (SAS) www.sassofia.com looks at the various requirements to meet with “minimum” Base Maintenance Requirements both related to Regulatory Compliance and Organisational Best Practices

Control of Approved Data - Applicable to the Specific Aircraft

Approved Data to be available to:

○ Stores Inspector

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Sofema Online (SOL) looks at the issues.

Introduction

Water and microbial contamination are issues of great concerns that are inherent to jet fuel. Certain bacteria and fungi are capable of existing in the water where it interfaces with the fuel. These microorganisms use alkanes and additives in fuel as foodstuff. These microbes can propagate rapidly.

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Sofema Online www.sofemaonline.com considers issued related to FAA & EASA Suspect Unapproved Parts (SUP)

Introduction

Both EASA and the FAA take very seriously the potential exposure regarding Suspect Parts and will typically take positive action to address once informed by Industry of the reason for the Suspect Part.

Parts manufactured without an appropriate and legal authorized release are described as "unapproved"; they may, in fact, be inferior counterfeits, or be original parts but have in fact been used beyond their time limits, or have not been correctly repaired or have been previously approved but not properly returned to service, be stolen, come with fraudulent labels, production overruns that were not sold with the agency's permission, and those that are untraceable.

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Sofema Aviation Services has the answer!

Introduction

The management of aircraft technical records whether from an operator’s perspective (Lessee) or representing the aircraft owner (Lessor) is 2 sides of the same story and whilst the operator is mandated to ensure the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft, the lessor is absolutely focused on managing the “asset” to protect their investment.

If you are looking to work either as a tech records specialist with the Airlines or to support the lessor organization – this course will provide a significant understanding of the many obligations, process & procedures which come together to manage an aircraft.

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SofemaOnline reviews the errors specifically attributable to interaction with documentation in the production of task cards and other maintenance data.

Introduction

It is both understood and recognized that certain aircraft maintenance errors are strongly linked to the issue of documentation both related to its content as well as the lack of use/engagement.

Related to technical authorship the primary concern is that the technician may misunderstand the information/context and as a result use their own knowledge instead of seeking clarification of a potential anomaly.

Case Study (Based on Data gathered following investigation & workshops)

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SofemaOnline takes a look at the pros and cons of aircraft lease options

The acquisition cost of aircraft is a significant undertaking with Boeing & Airbus Narrow Body Jets around the million USD.

Serious discounts are on offer for multiple purchases and with the buying power of the large leasing companies typically able to order aircraft well into double digits the leasing companies are able to generate interesting options for operators whereby the cost of acquisition can be more competitive from a leasing company than going to the manufacturer directly.

Note - Whilst this applies of course to new aircraft and the leasing companies have the added advantage of a portfolio of pre-owned aircraft.

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SofemaOnline takes a look at the Purpose of Maintenance Reserves within an Aircraft Leasing Arrangement

Introduction

The concept of Maintenance Reserves is designed to “protect” the Lessor by ensuring funds are available to cover major activities.

Maintenance reserve payments are typically calculated on flight hour, flight cycle, and/or calendar basis and are usually paid on a monthly basis in arrears.

At the time an aircraft is taken out of service for maintenance, the lessor should already have funds to cover the cost of outstanding maintenance.

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SofemaOnline takes a look at the importance of Aircraft Technical Records within the context of Aircraft Leasing

Introduction

When an aircraft has significant disconnects in the integrity of the records the value of the aircraft can be substantially affected. (Any lapses in maintenance documentation can be used as financial leverage). Airlines routinely spend up to $2000,000 USD related to narrow body returns and the majority of lease return costs relate to disconnects in the aircraft technical records.

The Value of an Aircraft equal is Technical Records?

Well, when you consider that without the Technical Records which support the aircraft it will not be able to fly then it is effectively a true statement!

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Introduction

Whilst Aircraft fuel-tank entry is essential for both inspection and modification it poses a number of hazards to maintenance personnel performing the work.

Fuel-tank work can be accomplished as required without placing personnel at risk through effective preparation and training.

The Maintenance Organisation should strive to ensure a safe, healthy work environment for fuel-tank personnel by identifying potential hazards, developing control measures, and instructing personnel in the specific procedures to be followed during all Aircraft fuel-tank maintenance activities.

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Posted by on in Regulatory

Primary Hazards related to Fuel Tank Working

There are a number of potential hazards which fuel-tank maintenance personnel may experience whilst engaged in Fuel Tank Work however the 2 primary hazards are:

a) Chemical
b) Physical

Considering Chemical Hazards and their Consequences - Fuel

Off course the most commonly recognized hazard is the jet fuel itself which is a flammable liquid and will ignite if the temperature of the fuel is such that vapour is created. (The temperature at which the vapours of a flammable liquid can ignite is known as the "flash point".)

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The Elements of Aircraft Maintenance – Part 4

An article by our Guest Blogger and SAS Instructor and Consultant Kevin Rookes

Welcome to the final part of a four-part series that explains what constitutes maintenance from an FAA perspective and what are the differences between the elements that make up maintenance.

In this article we look at what is not a maintenance activity.

ACTIVITIES WHICH ARE NOT MAINTENANCE

It is mistakenly believed that if something has the potential to cause harm to the aircraft or its operation, the activity should be covered as a maintenance activity. That perception probably has ties to the language that is used in the definition of a “major repair” in § 1.1: “Major repair means a repair: (1) That, if improperly done, might appreciably affect weight, balance, structural strength, performance, powerplant operation, flight characteristics, or other qualities affecting airworthiness…” This has led people to improperly classify some activities that could affect the airworthiness of the aircraft, if done improperly, as maintenance. These activities include:

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The Elements of Aircraft Maintenance – Part 3

An article by our Guest Blogger and SAS Instructor and Consultant Kevin Rookes

Welcome to the third part of a four-part series that explains what constitutes maintenance from an FAA perspective and what are the differences between the elements that make up maintenance?

This article provides an overview

REPLACEMENT OF PARTS

The replacement of parts is the removal and/or installation of parts on a product or article, and therefore, logically a maintenance task. However, there are some specific tasks that require further explanation.

Removing and Reinstalling the Same Part

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The Elements of Aircraft Maintenance – Part 2

An article by our Guest Blogger and SAS Instructor and Consultant Kevin Rookes

Welcome to the second part of a four-part series that explains what constitutes maintenance from an FAA perspective and what are the differences between the elements that make up maintenance?This article considers what makes up overhaul, repair and preservation.

OVERHAUL

An overhaul includes several separate maintenance activities to restore a product or article to a condition that will give a reasonable assurance of operation for a specified amount of time. The term “overhaul” is mentioned in several places in the FAR’s but this article uses the definition in 14 CFR section 43.2(a), which states that an overhaul consists of disassembly, cleaning, inspection, repaired as necessary, reassembly, and testing.

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The Elements of Aircraft Maintenance – Part 1

An article by our Guest Blogger and SAS Instructor and Consultant Kevin Rookes

This is the first part of a four-part series that explains what constitutes maintenance from an FAA perspective and what are the differences between the elements that make up maintenance. 

The term “maintenance” is defined in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 1, §1.1 as “inspection, overhaul, repair, preservation, and the replacement of parts, but excludes preventive maintenance.”
While this definition has been around for a long time, differences between the five elements that make up maintenance (i.e., inspection, overhaul, repair, preservation, and the replacement of parts) is not always clearly understood. The definition of maintenance does not include the terms “rebuild” or “rebuilt”. Those functions are limited to the Design Approval Holder (DAH) (i.e., manufacturer) with Production Certificate (PC) approval using its approved design data.

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Bridging Checks Introduction

Why would we want to carry out a Bridging Check?

Typically because we have recently acquired a “new to our organisation” aircraft and it is on a different maintenance schedule.

A bridging check is normally required to address tasks which have either not been done by the previous operator (maybe they are not applicable for a particular operator) or alternatively the tasks may have been done at different intervals when directly compared with your existing Maintenance Programme or Schedule.

A ‘bridging check’ is not in itself a maintenance package; rather it is the result of a detailed analysis of the pre and post transfer tasks to identify any differences which need to be addressed during the transfer bridging check.

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